Blog Archives

Epic infinite imbalance problem!

I really can’t get enough of these puzzles. Thanks to Paul Salomon for describing them. Go check out his work over at Lost In Recursion if you haven’t seen it yet. I would love to see what kinds of puzzles

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Posted in Advanced Chemistry, Multivariable Calculus

The number of photons ejected from the sun in a second

How many photons does the sun emit in a second? The following worksheet was used in companion with this post for chemistry students. Our chemistry class used the work of Brian Cox and (originally) John Herschel to determine the number

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Posted in Advanced Chemistry, Multivariable Calculus

Creating a post with scientific/mathematic symbols!

“How do you create mathematical or scientific symbols in a WordPress blog?” you ask. It is perhaps simpler than you thought! If you are familiar with (or want to learn) , then you can do this easily. I have used

Posted in Advanced Chemistry, Multivariable Calculus

Emergent phenomena [reducing reductionism to the maximum]

I just listened to this wonderful RADIOLAB rebroadcast on emergent phenomena. Jad and Robert start with synchronous fireflies in Thailand and end with Christof Koch and Sir Francis Crick’s study of the neural correlates of consciousness! If you haven’t heard

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Posted in Advanced Chemistry, Multivariable Calculus

Energy of electrons described by hydrogen wavefunctions

In a previous post, we showed the Bohr atom as represented at the Georgia State University Physics Department’s website in the following way: Is it possible to derive the total energy of electrons in the Bohr model from Schrodinger’s wavefunctions?

Posted in Advanced Chemistry, Multivariable Calculus

Why human calculation is still (sometimes) better than WolframAlpha

The last post relied heavily on WolframAlpha to calculate the average distance of the 1s electron from the hydrogen nucleus. As mentioned, this integral could be done by hand by “differentiating under the integral sign” as Feynman taught many to

Posted in Advanced Chemistry, Multivariable Calculus

The average distance of a 1s hydrogen electron

In the Bohr atom, the Bohr distance, , is associated with the average distance of the electron from the nucleus in the ground state of the hydrogen atom. Is this what quantum mechanics also predicts? From Schrödinger’s wave equation, is

Posted in Advanced Chemistry, Multivariable Calculus